Editorial

Luciana Nedel

Abstract


It is my pleasure to introduce you the first issue of the SBC Journal on 3D Interactive Systems (JIS) in 2012. This issue contains three original papers, which surprisingly cover the same research topic, the development of virtual reality systems.

The conception of fully interactive virtual reality systems is still a challenge. To choose the best interaction techniques and devices to each application task, to combine different technologies in a single system, to quickly prototype these systems, and to fulfill the expectations of the final user are just some few examples of problems that need to be faced by developers. The use of virtual reality and 3D interaction is yet new and there is not sufficient standards to follow in order to succeed.

The first paper of this issue, “Visual Programming for Virtual Reality Applications Based on InTml”, was written by Pablo Figueroa, Santiago Gil, Raul Oses, Juan Toro, Catalina Rodriguez, Christian Benavides and Esteban Correa, from Colombia. The paper presents VPE, a visual programming environment developed to help in the development of portable virtual reality applications. More than this, the authors report advantages and drawbacks of their approach and share with us the lessons learned with this work.

The paper “Assessment Systems for Training Based on Virtual Reality: A Comparison Study” authored by Ronei M. Moraes and Liliane S. Machado, from Brazil, discusses some of the challenges to construct a medical simulator based on virtual reality. An important question concerning the use of virtual reality based training is how to know when the user will be ready to practice in real situations. In this paper, the authors compared four methodologies for online assessment. The goal is to identify methods that could be used to reconfigure the simulation according to users’ performance in real time. I invite you to read the paper and make your own choices.

The third and last paper, “Experiences with Virtual Learning Using 3D Interactive Systems for Education and Training”, was written by Damian Schofield, from USA, and is also related to virtual reality simulators. The author presents a virtual learning environment (ViRILE) developed by his group and uses it to highlight the complex operational problems that have been encountered during the process. In this paper, the lessons learned with the experience are extrapolated into general guidelines that are here shared with the readers.

We hope this issue will fulfill your expectations. Enjoy it!


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