EXTERNAL ACTORS, GOOD GOVERNANCE AND HEALTH CARE DELIVERY IN AFRICA

Benjamin Uchenna Anaemene

Abstract


The structural adjustment programme imposed by the World Bank and IMF in the face of the serious economic crisis that confronted African states in the 1980s resulted in severe cuts in state spending on social services including health. State failure in the provision of social services led to the externalisation of responsibility for health and the proliferation of actors working in the field of health across the continent. Despite the positive and negative consequences of this development on Africa, the debate about the role of external actors in health care delivery in Africa has dwelt extensively on the degree they should participate neglecting the emphasis on how they participate, under what conditions and with what consequences. Using qualitative data techniques, this article examines the involvement of external actors in health care delivery in Africa illustrating the nature, pattern, dimensions, and dynamics of such engagements in the context of popular concerns with good governance. It found that governance challenges constitute a serious obstacle to better health outcome in Africa. It posits that African states can only maximise their gains from external assistance for health if they take leadership in coordinating health activities in their countries within the context of a comprehensive national health plan.


Keywords


External Actors; Good Governance; Health; Africa; Aid



DOI: https://doi.org/10.22456/2238-6912.91982

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AUSTRAL: Brazilian Journal of Strategy & International Relations  e-ISSN 2238-6912; ISSN 2238-6262  Published by the Brazilian Center for Strategy & International Relations.
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