FAILED STRATEGY? THE LEGACY OF BARACK OBAMA’S PRESIDENCY IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Authors

  • Magdalena Lewicka PhD, Representative for the region of Europe of the International Association of Academic Centers for Arabic Studies.
  • Michał Dahl PhD Candidate, Faculty of Political Science and Security Studies, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22456/2238-6912.108984

Keywords:

U.S. Foreign Policy, MENA, Barack Obama, George W. Bush

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to verify whether “a failed strategy”, a phrase commonly used in the literature, is an adequate description of Barack Obama’s legacy in the Middle East and North Africa. Based on the selected political manifestos and actions in the sphere of diplomacy, it has been proven that the Middle East and North Africa was not a priority to the decision-makers in Washington in the years 2009–2012, unlike in the years 2005–2008. However, although President Obama did not manage to implement most of his original plans, he achieved a few significant successes, the most notable of which is the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq and the conclusion of the nuclear deal with Iran. Authors seek to contextualize and explain Obama’s failures and successes, arguing that using the phrase “a failed strategy” does not reflect the complexity of the problems analyzed.

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Author Biography

Michał Dahl, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Political Science and Security Studies, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland.

Associate Professor; School of International Sport Organizations; Beijing Sport University. Faculty of Political Science and International Studies, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland.

Published

2022-08-31

How to Cite

Lewicka, M., & Dahl, M. (2022). FAILED STRATEGY? THE LEGACY OF BARACK OBAMA’S PRESIDENCY IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA. AUSTRAL: Brazilian Journal of Strategy &Amp; International Relations, 10(20). https://doi.org/10.22456/2238-6912.108984

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Section

Articles